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Workers Are Demanding JobKeeper But Refusing To Come To Work

Workers are demanding JobKeeper but refusing to come to work

Workers are demanding the JobKeeper payment but are refusing to come to work, according to some employers.

The Brisbane Times is reporting that employees are telling their employers they:

  • don’t want to work at all;
  • or want to work minimal hours;
  • but still receive want to receive the $1,500 a fortnight JobKeeper payment.

Workers are demanding JobKeeper despite not wanting to work

Payments of the $1,500 JobKeeper wage subsidy begin today.

More than 275,000 businesses have already made formal applications for the scheme.

Following complaints of rogue bosses rorting the subsidy, reports are now emerging of employees also abusing the payments.

The owner of a hospitality business on the New South Wales south coast spoke to The Brisbane Times.

She claims some staff didn’t want to work, but had still demanded JobKeeper payments.

The business owner, who employs 50 staff, says she will struggle to pay casual workers the $1,500 a fortnight while waiting for reimbursement from the government.

“One of our young casuals who does 10 hours a week said ‘I am entitled to it, go to the bank and get my money’.

“It’s not money for jam.

“What are we breeding in young ones?”


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Staff don’t want to work extra hours

Fast Food franchise owner Suresh Patel told The Brisbane Times staff are not incentivised to work because they know they are going to receive the full $1,500, regardless of how much they work.

“The root of the problem is that because all employees get the same amount regardless of how many hours they actually work, staff don’t want to work extra hours.”

Another business owner asked for guidance as to whether staff are eligible for JobKeeper if they refuse to work altogether. 

They posted the question on the ATO website:

“We have staff who are refusing to attend work saying they are apprehensive of health risks.

“We are in hairdressing and are abiding by all laws and restrictions.

Are they eligible for JobKeeper payments through us if they simply refuse a directive to work?”

Employees must comply with employment contracts

Attorney-General Christian Porter says employees must comply with their employment contracts and be available to work.

“Employees have obligations under their employment contracts to perform work as long as it is safe to do so.

“Having an entitlement to JobKeeper does not relieve employees of those obligations.”

Porter says arrangements for working from home need to be by agreement with employers.

Furthermore, if working from home is not an option, then this might involve taking some form of paid or unpaid leave.

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